UnconventionalEXPERTS.com

An Employee Workshop for Aspiring Experts

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A.

Testing ideas within the individual work-process

1) Intellectual curiosity
2) Initiate activity
3) Gain relevant information
4) Strategize
5) Commit to a project
6) Create ideas
7) Test ideas
8) Fail
9) Use failure as a platform for new and better ideas
10) Repeat (eventually … find mastery)

Group #1 – Non-experts positions
            Structured
            Repetitive
            Task-oriented
            Company-process-driven
            Unskilled-to-midskilled

For this group, compensation will increase to a fairly low degree over time, assuming the individual in the position says in the exact same position. Because an individual with six months experience will probably have similar capabilities as someone with five years experience, the value of the work does not change all that much. The best attributes the employee offers is reliability, which is usually taken into consideration when there are compensation increases. Within some positions, reliability is an extremely important quality, and compensation will be  commensurate.

Group #2 – Traditional “establishment” experts
            Traditional professional positions
            Traditional skilled trade positions

For this group, there will be a traditional “establishment” education attached. Since an education costs a lot of time and money, this is factored into compensation. Because the work experience typically adds onto the education, within the same area of expertise, there is great value. Traditional “establishment” experts are paid for their expertise. Usually, their compensation is easily comparable, as their positions are well established and fit within predictable guidelines.

Group #3 – Leadership experts
            Supervisors
            Managers
            Directors
            VPs
            Presidents
            CxOs

Leadership can be an area of expertise on its own. It is often an additional area of expertise, on top of a traditional “establishment” expertise. The compensation levels of leadership experts is extremely wide. Some sales managers make less than their subordinates, because they do not make commissions. Some CEOs make millions, as their compensation ties into company profit increases.

Group #4 – Unconventional Experts
            Unstructured
            Complex
            Creativity-driven
            Strategy-dependent
            Project-oriented
            Positions that do not fit into groups #1, #2 or #3.
            Positions that fit into groups #1, #2 or #3, however, company leadership assigns them to this group as part of a greater strategy

For unconventional experts, compensation standards cannot be clearly defined. Because achievements often exist outside of an established or historical realm, the work will be more organically compensated based on expertise and consistent achievement.

Unconventional experts need to:
• Log their own achievements and present them in terms that can be easily understood.

The Unconventional Expert life
When we reach adulthood, we find ourselves in a situation that is both burdensome and liberating. Not instantly, but over time; we become self-sufficient. Finding financial self-reliance means that we don’t need family or government assistance. Finding maturity means that we can stand on our own two feet without having to persistently lean on anyone or anything for financial or emotional support.

Finding ourselves within our work is an important part of finding maturity. We cannot be self-sufficient if we cannot contribute. Like drinking water, our work efforts are a natural part of our survival. Like eating, our work has an automatic nature to it; moving in a general direction, without the need to over-thinking.

Inhibitors to curiosity:
Forget about future and past, live in the here-and-now
The job is the only boss, focus on job.
Forget about outside demands, focus on job

free unstructured mind, free from convictions, preconceived ideas, conclusions, bias, conditions, attachments, judgements, ideals, hopes, likes, dislikes, reverence, obedience, preconditions. cravings for recognition, craving for power, no wishful thinking.

manipulate circumstances, not people. rely on self, not outside authority, puts no head higher, seeks no approval, does not need to be one-up,

not … big shot, begging attitude, conform, envious comparisons, suggestible, begs personal recognition, imitates.

Start thinking about the subject matter in terms of everything:

Someone bumps into the rear tail light on a motorcycle and breaks it off. Instead of wasting energy on getting mad at the person who breaks it, one should have confidence in their intellectual curiosity, to initiate problem solving.

How can one learn about the tail light?
            Remove two screws and one bolt, to look at its construction.
How is it designed?
            Very tightly designed, with few parts.
Why was it designed this way?
            For low weight and a low number of parts to manufacture.
What are the options for replacement?
            After looking up on the internet …
            (1) Buy factory OEM tail light.
            (2) Replace with aftermarket tail light.
What were the cost considerations in solution?
            After looking up on the internet …
            (1) OEM replacement is expensive.
            (2) Aftermarket OEM is much less expensive, but would need to buy two of them so that left and right tail lights will match
What are the time considerations in replacement.
            After looking up on the internet …
            (1) OEM replacement is simple.
            (2) Wiring is extremely tight, installing aftermarket replacement may require wire extensions which will require additional time and parts.
Decision: Purchase OEM replacement.

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Unconventional experts do not know that they are experts, as the knowledge they seek always brings them to a new starting point. Here is a quick test to determine if you are an unconventional expert or potential unconventional expert:

1) What is your answer to the below questions?
A) Yes to all, or the vast majority.
B) Yes to most.
C) No to all, or the vast majority.
D) No to most.

• Do you work well within unstructured environments?
• Do you adapt well to complex situations?
• Are you flexible?
• Can you effectively strategize?
• Do you move quickly to activity?
• Can you commit to large projects?
• Do you generally hold a long-term focus?
• Do you work well within environments that have limited guidance or processes?
• Can you create an individual work-process where company-process does not exist?
• Do you elevate and follow your own intellectual curiosity?
• Can you self-train?
• Can you self-learn?
• Are you a self-starter?
• Do you invent?
• Can you find relevant information through the use of the internet as a tool?
• Can you overcome obstacles?
• Can you change directions?
• Do you create ideas?
• Do you test the ideas that you create?
• Do you recognize failure as part of the work-process?
• Do you use failure as a platform for new and better ideas?
• Eventually, do you plan on finding mastery?

2) If you were to step into a different role for one month, which position would interest you the most?
A) A position that is structured, repetitive, task-oriented, company-process-driven.
B) A position that would best fit your current profession or skilled trade, as this follows your career goals.
C) A leadership position.
D) A position that is unstructured, complex, creativity-driven, strategy-dependent, project-oriented.

3) What work environment would you rather work in?
A) An environment where there is an established operational company work-process that you follow?
B) An environment where you need to create and follow your own way of doing things within an individual work-process?

4) A co-worker told you that they created and followed their own individual work-process. How would you relate to the below process?
A) Does not make any sense at all.
B) Looks perfect.
C) Looks similar to an individual work-process that you might have created, but with some differences.

1) Intellectual curiosity
2) Initiate activity
3) Gain relevant information
4) Strategize
5) Commit to a project
6) Create ideas
7) Test ideas
8) Fail
9) Use failure as a platform for new and better ideas
10) Repeat (eventually … find mastery

5) In your adult life, have you committed to one or more of the below extremely challenging and complex long-term free-time activities?

A) Yes, I’ve dedicated a large amount of time to one or more of the above.
B) Yes, but no more than the average person.
C) No.

• Hobbies
• Arts
• Crafts
• DIY home improvements
• Connoisseurship
• Inventions
• Disciplines

6) To find relevant information, the internet is an excellent tool. What is your level of efficiency when searching for information online?
A) If the information is there, I can find it.
B) I am good at internet search.
C) I am not very good, when it comes to finding information through the internet.

How did you do?
If you did well on this test, you are probably an unconventional expert or potential unconventional expert. Continuing to module #2 and learning more will be a knee-jerk reaction, because your intellectual curiosity has a strong hold on your activity and it doesn’t take much to motivate you to activity. Learning more about this concept will be different than learning something new. It will be a self-examination of your existing characteristics and a discovery of how they are explained within this concept.

If you had a difficult time understanding this test, you are still invited to read on. Gaining insight into the unconventional expert concept may help you better understand your potential and your options.

“Culture of Experts” unconventional expert profile

Within your career:
Complexity:
Within your career, what was the most complex work that you have done?
Creativity:
Within your career, what work required the most creativity and what ideas did you develop?
Failure:
Give a specific example within your career when you tested an idea and it resulted in failure? How did you overcome failure?

Within your personal projects – hobbies, arts, crafts, DIY home improvements, connoisseurship, inventions and disciplines:
Complexity:
Within your personal projects, hat was the most complex work that you have done that was initiated by you voluntarily and not required.
Creativity:
Within your career or person projects, what work required the most creativity and what ideas did you develop.
Failure:
Give a specific example within your personal projects when you tested an idea and it resulted in failure? How did you overcome failure?

Culture of Experts unconventional expert checklist

List ability level from 1-10:

• Do you work well within unstructured environments?
• Do you adapt well to complex situations?
• Are you flexible?
• Can you effectively strategize?
• Do you move quickly to activity?
• Can you commit to large projects?
• Do you generally hold a long-term focus?
• Do you work well within environments that have limited guidance or processes?
• Can you create an individual work-process where company-process does not exist?
• Do you elevate and follow your own intellectual curiosity?
• Can you self-train?
• Can you self-learn?
• Are you a self-starter?
• Do you invent?
• Can you find relevant information through the use of the internet as a tool?
• Can you overcome obstacles?
• Can you change directions?
• Do you create ideas?
• Do you test the ideas that you create?
• Do you recognize failure as part of the work-process?
• Do you use failure as a platform for new and better ideas?
• Eventually, do you plan on finding mastery?

• Can you thrive in an environment that is unstructured, requiring your own individual work-process when traditional processes are not available?
• Can you thrive in an environment that is unstructured?
• Can you thrive in an environment that is complex?
• Can you thrive in an environment that is creativity-driven?
• Can you thrive in an environment that is strategy-dependent?
• Can you thrive in an environment that is project-oriented?

1) Intellectual curiosity
2) Initiate activity
3) Gain relevant information
4) Strategize
5) Commit to a project
6) Create ideas
7) Test ideas
8) Fail
9) Use failure as a platform for new and better ideas
10) Repeat (eventually … find mastery

5) In your adult life, have you committed to one or more of the below extremely challenging and complex long-term free-time activities?

• Hobbies
• Arts
• Crafts
• DIY home improvements
• Connoisseurship
• Inventions
• Disciplines

6) To find relevant information, the internet is an excellent tool. What is your level of efficiency when searching for information online?
A) If the information is there, I can find it.
B) I am good at internet search.
C) I am not very good, when it comes to finding information through the internet.

Culture of Experts is a free talent program by Human Castle Executive Search. For expert recruitment visit us at www.humancastle.com or call (716)222-3535.

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